Book Ahead: Kahlo at the Tate Modern

By london_alex Last edited 146 months ago
Book Ahead: Kahlo at the Tate Modern
frida.jpg

In less than two weeks the much-anticipated Frida Kahlo exhibit will open at the Tate Modern. We are sure that this has not escaped our readers attention as we have been inundated with newspaper coverage of all aspects of the exhibit; from the decision of the curators to not incorporate anything but the paintings, to the re-hashing of Kahlo's interesting life. It has been hard to miss - the press office at the Tate Modern is working overtime.

If you have managed to escape the coverage, a good article to read was in last week's Times. In addition, The Guardian had a great feature on her life last week as well and if that is not enough, go rent Frida (2002) with Salma Hayek from your local DVD store.

This retrospective on Kahlo's work is sure to draw lines so be sure to book ahead on the Tate Modern website. (This is the first time she has had a solo show in the UK) Kahlo runs from 9 June - 9 October so you can be sure that every tourist visiting our fine city will be lining up to see it. Londonist's recommendation: if you can, go on a Monday morning at the earliest available time slot, this will probably be your best opportunity to get an unobstructed view of Kahlo's paintings.

Frida Kahlo on at the Tate Modern, 9 June - 9 October 2005, £10 (£8 concessions) with guided tours running on Wednesdays and Fridays for an additional £5.

Last Updated 23 May 2005

Katcha

I wish I were a Frida Kahlo fan - when I lived in Mexico my mother was always taking me to one exhibit or another - we even went to her house and wandered around her neighbourhood. She was an amazing person who overcame so much AND managed to sleep with both Diego Rivera (which I love) and Trotsky (and that's just cool).

But her paintings are so raw - some of them are beautiful, but the ones of like, dead babies lying in pools of blood at her vagina are... well, I find them a little less pretty. Imagine me at 12 being told these were what great art was... it freaked me out.