A Day In The Life Of A Door

By Rob Last edited 152 months ago
A Day In The Life Of A Door
10_downing_street.jpg

A couple of days ago, the Times brought us a day in the life of a London postman, and today the Guardian continues the theme with a day in the life of a London door.

The door in question just happens to be the door to Number 10 Downing Street, and the feature is actually more interesting than you'd think. In fact it delivers one of Londonist's favourite quotes of the week from the policeman outside the door on being asked if he ever gets bored:

"I wouldn't say I switch off exactly, I prefer to say I'm like a coiled spring."

So what else can we learn from this exposé of the country's most famous front door?

- The nought is "wonky" apparently. We can't say we ever noticed.

- Tony seens to prefer the "upmarket" butties of Marks & Spencers for his informal meetings.

- T & C have the "early edition of the London Evening Standard" delivered to their door. God help us all.

- "There are at least two alternative entrances to 10 Downing Street". Londonist likes to think that one of these is through a revolving fireplace (maybe that one you always see them posing in front of with foreign ambassadors); and the other is a huge transparent tube which sucks the visitors away to a secret location.

If you think that Number 10 gets too much attention and should maybe stop hogging the limelight a little, you can always visit the website for Number 11.

Downing Street's entry on Wikipedia.

Downing Street Fighter - the flash game.

Last Updated 15 December 2004

marty

It's incredible isn't it? There's a policeman outside his door 24 hours a day, and still Tony Blair manages to get out.

Arf, arf!